Home » The English Gardener: Or a Treatise on the Situation, Soil, Enclosing and Laying-Out by William Cobbett
The English Gardener: Or a Treatise on the Situation, Soil, Enclosing and Laying-Out William Cobbett

The English Gardener: Or a Treatise on the Situation, Soil, Enclosing and Laying-Out

William Cobbett

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781330190296
Paperback
354 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Excerpt from The English Gardener: Or a Treatise on the Situation, Soil, Enclosing and Laying-OutThe Situation having been fixed on, the Soil prepared, the Form determined on, and the enclosures made, the next thing that will be presented to theMoreExcerpt from The English Gardener: Or a Treatise on the Situation, Soil, Enclosing and Laying-OutThe Situation having been fixed on, the Soil prepared, the Form determined on, and the enclosures made, the next thing that will be presented to the reader will be the manner of laying out the ground within the enclosure, whether into plats, borders, or otherwise.3. The third Chapter will form a sort of Episode, disconnected with the general course of the work. It will treat of the managing of Hot-beds and Green-houses: that is to say, it will treat of the management of things which are to be produced by artificial heat- and that are cultivated by rules exclusively adapted to this species of gardening. I shall not treat of Hot-houses, the management of those being a science of itself, having nothing to do with gardening in general, and of use to comparatively very few persons. My object will be to make a book of general utility- to do this, moderate bulk and moderate price are requisites- and, to have these, the management of hot-houses must be necessarily excluded.4. The fourth Chapter will treat of Propagation and Cultivation in general. First, of the sort of the seed, and of the methods of procuring true seed, and of ascertaining whether it be sound: next, of the manner of harvesting and of preserving seeds: next, of the manner of sowing seeds- next, of transplanting plants: next of the after cultivation, until the plant be fit for the uses for which it is intended.5. After these general observations on propagation and cultivation, there will follow in Chapter V. a complete list, in alphabetical order, of all kitchen-garden plants, including pot-herbs, with particular instructions relative to each plant- so that these instructions, together with the readers previous knowledge respecting propagation and cultivation in general, will leave nothing that will be unknown to him with regard to the kitchen-garden plants and pot-herbs.6. Next in Chapter VI. will come the important subject of Fruits. This Chapter will treat of the manner of propagating, rearing up, planting, pruning, and cultivating fruit-trees-whether wall-trees, espaliers, or standards, and whether for the garden or the orchard- also of those plants of inferior size which bring us gooseberries, currants, raspberries, and strawberries.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.